HOME

About Us

Why advertise with us?

How can we help you

Contacts

Subscription packages

Dukes Head Hotel

Please visit our other conference venues sites…

Conference Venues Ashford

Conference Venues Basingstoke

Conference Venues Bath

Conference Venues Blackburn

Conference Venues Blackpool

Conference Venues Bradford

Conference Venues Brighton

Conference Venues Bristol

Conference Venues Bournemouth

Conference Venues Bury St Edmunds

Conference Venues Cambridge

Conference Venues Cardiff

Conference Venues Carlisle

Conference Venues Cheadle

Conference Venues Chelmsford

Conference Venues Cheltenham

Conference Venues Chester

Conference Venues Colchester

Conference Venues Derby













Conference Venues Eastbourne

Conference Venues Exeter

Conference Venues Folkestone

Conference Venues Gloucester

Conference Venues Hastings

Conference Venues High Wycombe

Conference Venues Ipswich

Conference Venues Kidderminster

Conference Venues Kings Lynn

Conference Venues Leeds

Conference Venues Luton

Conference Venues Maidstone

Conference Venues Middlesbrough

Conference Venues Milton Keynes

Conference Venues Nantwich

Conference Venues Newbury

Conference Venues Newcastle

Conference Venues New Forest

Conference Venues Norwich












Conference Venues Northampton

Conference Venues Nottingham

Conference Venues Oxford

Conference Venues Peterborough

Conference Venues Portsmouth

Conference Venues Plymouth

Conference Venues Reading

Conference Venues Redditch

Conference Venues Richmond

Conference Venues Salisbury

Conference Venues Shrewsbury

Conference Venues High Southampton

Conference Venues Stratford upon Avon

Conference Venues Swindon

Conference Venues Telford

Conference Venues Worcester












Originally named Bishop’s Lynn, the town was part of the manor of the Bishop of Norwich in the 12th century. By the 14th century, the town ranked as the third port of England. It still retains two buildings that were warehouses of the Hanseatic League that were in use between the 15th and 17th centuries.
When Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1538, the town and manor became royal property. The names King’s Lynn and Lynn Regis reflect this change. The town became very prosperous from the 17th century through the export of corn; the fine Customs House was built in 1683 to the designs of local architect Henry Bell.
The town went into decline after this period, and was only rescued by the relatively late arrival of railway services in 1847. In the post-Second World War period it was designated a London Expansion Town, and its population roughly doubled as thousands of people were relocated from the capital.

The history of Kings Lynn